Candide

catholic by birth; scientist by choice; sinner by merit. gaidhlig-speaking neuroscience student at oxford. likes to question everything! @di_macd

Books that nailed it and books that failed it 2013!

In a bid to improve my online presence I am now on twitter (CLICK TO FOLLOW!) and have had a mass clear-out of some of my more, ehm, exuberant youthful postings on tumblr…

So I spent today playing with human brains. The first time you hold someone’s loves, hopes and fears between your hands is really quite a numinous moment. It is just amazing to reflect that a person’s entire memory, their desires and hates, their quirks and oddities, are all written as a pattern of neural connections onto that orange-sized chunk of porridgy stuff. It makes me remember why I’m here, that in spite of how heavy and difficult the work load is, I really am in the privileged position of learning how our biology, our brains, our behavior, really works.

Just thought I’d like to share…


Brains in jars still remain in this abandoned Russian neuroscience laboratory
Once upon a time, these preserved human and animal brains were once lovingly studied by Soviet-era neuroscientists. But when the lab was abandoned — perhaps in a hurry — these lonely brains were left behind.
There are few details on this abandoned neuroscience lab, so we’ll have to take the photographer’s word that it’s the real deal. Supposedly, this former Soviet laboratory sits in Moscow, where it was operated by the army. Some time after the lab was hastily abandoned, it was sealed off. But civilians who venture inside will see skinned animal heads, slides depicting brain cross-sections, and lots and lots of actual brains amidst the more mundane dirty dishes and glassware. Head over to the Russian blog brusnichka for more macabre photos from the lab.

Brains in jars still remain in this abandoned Russian neuroscience laboratory

Once upon a time, these preserved human and animal brains were once lovingly studied by Soviet-era neuroscientists. But when the lab was abandoned — perhaps in a hurry — these lonely brains were left behind.

There are few details on this abandoned neuroscience lab, so we’ll have to take the photographer’s word that it’s the real deal. Supposedly, this former Soviet laboratory sits in Moscow, where it was operated by the army. Some time after the lab was hastily abandoned, it was sealed off. But civilians who venture inside will see skinned animal heads, slides depicting brain cross-sections, and lots and lots of actual brains amidst the more mundane dirty dishes and glassware. Head over to the Russian blog brusnichka for more macabre photos from the lab.

(via xmorbidcuriosityx)

My Day As A TV Star

I did an hour long television interview yesterday, sitting on a rock in the middle of the sea.

Then I had to walk inspirationally along the beach, with the wind howling and the waves pounding.

Then I had to look out to the ocean and think deep thoughts as I did so.

I felt like Brian Cox. I had the aweinspiring backdrop and I got to expound about neuroscience and biology. (Also had to talk about uni which was less fun). (Also it was in Scottish Gaelic) (Also they are filming me again in Oxford, with the dreaming spires behind me - it will be humiliating! :[)

On another a note, Brian Cox was on Doctor Who. He should be the next Doctor!

xo-sz:

Meet Gunther. Isn’t he a babe?

xo-sz:

Meet Gunther. Isn’t he a babe?

tarartara:

Art inspired by Neuroscience. Cajal.

tarartara:

Art inspired by Neuroscience. Cajal.

Brain clocks. Just add sunlight.

deoxyribolove:

Batteries power the clock in your living room. Sunlight powers the one in your brain—or at least keeps it accurate. That jet lag you feel when you step off a plane after an epic trip is caused by a brain clock, or circadian rhythm, out of sync with the world. Therefore, the best thing you can do after such a trip? Is go out into the sunlight, and stay in it long enough for the sun and the brain clock to synchronize.   

Sunlight is absorbed by special cells in the eye called intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs). These cells do not need the rods and cones in the eye responsible for vision. Instead, they contain the pigment melanopsin that absorbs the sunlight directly. The ipRGCs then project to the superchiasmatic nucleus (SCN), which contains the “clock cells.” Levels of PER and CRY proteins in these cells increase and decrease on a regular time schedule, marking the 24 hours of the day (more or less), and tell the brain what time it is. [If you want more detail on that, let me know. It’s pretty amazing].

At least, that’s the classic model. 

But what’s this? New research is saying that we don’t need the ipRGCs for our circadian rhythms either. The rods and cones of the retina can do a fine job setting the brain clock without these special melanopsin-containing cells. Surprisingly, The retina seems to have a rhythm of its own! In fact, if you take a retina, put it in a petri dish, and then sync it to light, you can sync the clock of SCN cells by just plopping them into the same petri dish! No projections necessary!

Somehow, the retina is sending out signals that can synchronize the SCN. What it is sending out? Hormones? Neurotransmitters? Magic powers? No one knows. 

For now, though, it might be best to just keep syncing with sunlight. >_<

am9210:

Brain comparisons.

When you see real-life brains from different animals, probably the most striking thing is how titchy rat, mouse, bird, cat and even horse brains are compared to our own.

am9210:

Brain comparisons.

When you see real-life brains from different animals, probably the most striking thing is how titchy rat, mouse, bird, cat and even horse brains are compared to our own.

(via am9210-deactivated20121005)

biocanvas:

The brain of a neonatal mouse at 10-times magnification.
Image by Dr. Bradley Molyneaux, Harvard University.

biocanvas:

The brain of a neonatal mouse at 10-times magnification.

Image by Dr. Bradley Molyneaux, Harvard University.